Tagged: Mathematical Problems

Mathematical Infinity

“There are two approaches to mathematical infinity. It can be seen as defining limiting cases that can never be realized or as existing in some philosophical sense. These mathematical approaches parallel approaches to meaning and value that I call absolutist and evolutionary. The absolutist sees ultimate meaning as something that exists most commonly in the form of an all powerful infinite God. The evolutionary sees life and all of a creation as an ever expanding journey with no ultimate or final goal. There is only the journey. There is no destination. This video argues for an evolutionary view in our sense of meaning and values and in our mathematical understanding. There is a deep connection between the two with profound implications for the evolution of consciousness and human destiny.” (Paul Budnik)

Unsolved Millenium Problems

The Clay Institute offers a prize to anyone who can solve one of these Millenium problems.  Here is a description of the problems from the Institute’s website: Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture Mathematicians have always been fascinated by the problem of describing all solutions in whole numbers x,y,z to algebraic equations like x2 + y2 = z2 Euclid gave the complete solution for that equation, but for more complicated equations this becomes extremely difficult. Indeed, in 1970 Yu. V. Matiyasevich showed that Hilbert’s tenth problem is unsolvable, i.e., there is no general method for determining when such equations have a solution in whole...

Poincaré Conjecture

This explanation is quoted from the  The Clay Mathematics Institute, Poincaré Conjecture. (solved by: Grigoriy Perelman, 2002-3) “If we stretch a rubber band around the surface of an apple, then we can shrink it down to a point by moving it slowly, without tearing it and without allowing it to leave the surface. On the other hand, if we imagine that the same rubber band has somehow been stretched in the appropriate direction around a doughnut, then there is no way of shrinking it to a point without breaking either the rubber band or the doughnut. We say the surface...

The Number Pi

From Wikipedia: “π (sometimes written pi) is a mathematical constant that is the ratio of any circle’s circumference to its diameter. π is approximately equal to 3.14 in the usual decimal notation. Many formulae in mathematics, science, and engineering involve π, which makes it one of the most important mathematical constants.For instance, the area of a circle is equal to π times the square of the radius of the circle. π is an irrational number, which means that its value cannot be expressed exactly as a fraction having integers in both the numerator and denominator. Consequently, its decimal representation never...

Mathematical Problems

Here are some unsolved mathematical problems: Goldbach’s conjecture: Can every even integer greater than 2 be written as a sum of two primes? Twin Prime Conjecture: A twin prime is a pair of primes with difference 2, such as 11 and 13. Are there infinitely many twin primes? Does the Fibonacci sequence contain an infinite number of primes? Are there infinitely many perfect numbers? Are there any odd perfect numbers? The Clay Mathematics Institute posted seven unresolved problems in 2000; they also offer a prize of $1.000.000 for each solution. One of the problems has been solved (Poincaré Conjecture –...