Tagged: Mathematicians

John Von Neumann: The Mathematician. 1947

John von Neumann wrote The Mathematician which was published in Works of the Mind Vol. I no. 1 (University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1947), 180-196. It has also been published in von Neumann’s Collected Works. A discussion of the nature of intellectual work is a difficult task in any field, even in fields which are not so far removed from the central area of our common human intellectual effort as mathematics still is. A discussion of the nature of any intellectual effort is difficult per se – at any rate, more difficult than the mere exercise of that particular intellectual...

Georg Cantor

from the MacTutor History of Mathematics archive, article byJ J O’Connor and E F Robertson:  “Georg Cantor‘s father, Georg Waldemar Cantor, was a successful merchant, working as a wholesaling agent in St Petersburg, then later as a broker in the St Petersburg Stock Exchange. Georg Waldemar Cantor was born in Denmark and he was a man with a deep love of culture and the arts. Georg’s mother, Maria Anna Böhm, was Russian and very musical. Certainly Georg inherited considerable musical and artistic talents from his parents being an outstanding violinist. Georg was brought up a Protestant, this being the religion...

Georg Cantor Quotes

The final problem which Cantor grappled with was the realization that there could be no set containing everything, since, given any set, there is always a larger set — its set of subsets. Furthermore, he believes that infinity actually exists – it is not just a mathematical construct.  Cantor came to the conclusion that there is an Absolute Infinite that transcends transfinite numbers. It has mathematical properties, and he identified this concept with God. Subsequently, he believed that his new mathematics is actually a form of theology.  Here are some quotes by Georg Cantor: I have never proceeded from any...

Paul Erdös

from the MacTutor History of Mathematics archive, article byJ J O’Connor and E F Robertson:  Born: 26 March 1913 in Budapest, Hungary Died: 20 Sept 1996 in Warsaw, Poland Paul Erdös came from a Jewish family (the original family name being Engländer) although neither of his parents observed the Jewish religion. Paul’s father Lajos and his mother Anna had two daughters, aged three and five, who died of scarlet fever just days before Paul was born. This naturally had the effect making Lajos and Anna extremely protective of Paul. He would be introduced to mathematics by his parents, themselves both...

Mathematicians

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