Tagged: Carl Jung

C.G. Jung: Die sieben Reden an die Toten. 1916

Einleitung Der ägyptische Gnostiker Basilides in Alexandria (117 – 138 AD) bezeichnete das Symbol des höchsten Urwesens mit “Abraxas” (griechisch Ἀβρασάξ, Ἀβράξας). Aus diesem Urwesen entstehen die fünf Urkräfte: Geist(Nous), Wort ( Logos), Vorsehung (Phronesis), Weisheit(Sophia), sowie Macht und sittliche Vollkommenheit, die inneren Frieden einschliesst. Basilides verarbeitete verschiedene christlich-jüdische, persische und neuplatonische Überlieferungen zu einem dualistischen Weltbild.Das frühe Christentum war stark gnostisch geprägt, gnostische Richtungen gab es auch im Judentum, und sogar der Islam hat seine Gnostiker (die Sufis). Die Gnostiker gehen davon aus, dass der Kern eines jeden Menschen ein “göttlicher Funke” ist. Der göttliche Funke ist unsterblich, er existiert außerhalb...

C. G. Jung: Psychological Types. 1921

(Translation by H. Godwyn Baynes, 1923) GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE TYPES A. INTRODUCTION In the following pages I shall attempt a general description of the types, and my first concern must be with the two general types I have termed introverted and extraverted. But, in addition, I shall also try to give a certain characterization of those special types whose particularity is due to the fact that his most differentiated function plays the principal role in an individual’s adaptation or orientation to life. The former I would term general attitude types, since they are distinguished by the direction of general interest or...

Carl Jung: Quotes

There is a good documentary about Carl Jung: Matters of the Heart, 1983. And here is Jung in an interview, from 1957. “The psyche is the greatest of all cosmic wonders and the sine qua non of the world as an object. It is in the highest degree odd that Western man, with but very few and ever fewer exceptions, apparently pays so little regard to this fact….Swamped by the knowledge of external objects, the subject of all knowledge has been temporarily eclipsed to the point of seeming nonexistence.”   C. G. Jung, 1946, CW 8, par. 357. “Not nature but...

Carl Jung: Late Thoughts. 1962

From: Memories, Dreams, Reflections. By C. G. Jung Recorded And Edited By Aniela Jaffé.(abbreviated in the footnotes as AJ) This is the last chapter of the book, and represents Jungs final thoughts on some eternal questions about human nature. He died in 1961, and it was published in 1962. Late Thoughts ANY BIOGRAPHY of myself must, I think, take account of the following reflections. It is true that they may well strike others as highly theoretical, but making “theory” of this sort is as much a part of me, as vital a function of mine, as eating and drinking. What...

Erich Neumann: Depth Psychology and a New Ethic.

Erich Neumann (1905-1960) was born in Berlin. He received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in 1927 and then continued to study medicine at the University of Berlin. He met C.G. Jung first in 1933, at a seminar Jung was conducting in Berlin. Jung was fifty-seven years old and already famous for his own brand of psychotherapy. The two men started a correspondence that would continue until Neumann’s death in 1960. A lifelong Zionist, Neumann fled Nazi Germany with his family and settled in Tel Aviv in 1934, where he would become the founding father of analytical psychology...

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961)

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychoanalyst who created a version of psychoanalysis that is still very popular today. His system blends to some degree with New Age thinking and resonates with a popular cultural trend that is fascinated by mythology, dreams, storytelling, and archetypes.

C.G. Jung: Basic Postulates of Analytical Psychology. 1933

Source: Modern Man in Search of a Soul, 1933. Published by Routledge & Kegan Paul, translated by Cary Baynes. Reproduced here: Chapter IX, The Basic Postulates of Analytical Psychology. IT was universally believed in the Middle Ages as well as in the Græco-Roman world that the soul is a substance. Indeed, mankind as a whole has held this belief from its earliest beginnings, and it was left for the second half of the nineteenth century to develop a “psychology without the soul”. [the German Seele = soul or psyche] Under the influence of scientific materialism, everything that could not be...