Tagged: Feynman

Philosophical Implications of Quantum Mechanics

Richard Feynman (1918-1988) argues in his famous Lectures on Physics (1961/62) that finite accuracy of measurement also makes the future very unpredictable, because even very small errors in prediction have cascading effects that lead to vastly different outcomes. Thus, the difference between a classical interpretation (deterministic) and a quantum-mechanical explanation (indeterminisitc) is not as categorical as we sometimes assume. He compares classical and quantum-mechanical approaches to physics, and comes to the conclusion that “…it  is not true that we can pursue science completely by using only those concepts which are directly subject to experiment.” If this applies to physics, it is...

Richard Feynman (1918-1988)

Richard Feynman is a physicist who won the Nobel Prize,  worked on the Manhattan Project, he played a key role in explaining the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, and he is known for the “Feynman diagrams” that symbolize particle collisions. He gave famous introductory lectures on physics, which is now available online. The online edition features all the lectures on matter, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics. It’s not easy to understand, but as Feynman himself once said, “Hell, if I could explain it to the average person, it wouldn’t have been worth the Nobel Prize.“ In 1959, he gave a lecture that...