Tagged: Jacques Lacan

Jacques Lacan: The Neurotic’s Individual Myth. 1953

This paper originated from a lecture Lacan delivered in Paris in the early 1950s; the initial text was distributed in 1953. A modified French edition was done by Jacques-Alain Miller and with the approval of Lacan was published in the journal Ornicar? in 1979, and in the same year an English translation appeared in “Psychoanalytic Quarterly,” which is the basis for the following text. This is an early lecture, before Lacan’s official seminars started (Seminar 1 was given in 1954.) It demonstrates Lacan’s basic structural approach to the psyche, which he refined into topological models throughout his work. The current...

Michel de Certeau: Lacan – An Ethics of Speech (1983)

The Jesuit priest Michel de Certeau was a collaborator of Lacan and a director of one of the Lacanian Schools. He is also an anthropologist; in the following essay, he provides a perspective on Lacanian theory as an intimate outsider to the Lacanian movement. The following essay is quoted from the journal “Representations, No. 3 (Summer, 1983), pp. 21-39. Published by: University of California Press.”  It can also be found in [easyazon_link identifier=”0816614040″ locale=”US” tag=”mainacademicsite-20″]Heterologies: Discourse on the Other[/easyazon_link], 1986 by Michel De Certeau (Author), B. Massumi (Translator). Chapter 4, p. 47ff. (Numbers throughout the text refer to the footnotes at...

Lacan: The Mirror Stage

The idea of the “mirror stage” is an important early component in Lacan’s reinterpretation of the work of Freud. Drawing on work in physiology and animal psychology, Lacan proposes that human infants pass through a stage in which an external image of the body (reflected in a mirror, or represented to the infant through the mother or primary caregiver) produces a psychic response that gives rise to the mental representation of an “I”. The infant identifies with the image, which serves as a gestalt of the infant’s emerging perceptions of selfhood, but because the image of a unified body does...

Lacan’s Life

The following chronology of Lacan’s life and work is based on a list of dates, publications, and events, assembled by the authors of Lacan.com. There is also an excellent overview of his life and his work at the Stanford Encyclopedia for Philosophy. 1901  —  Jacques-Marie-Émile Lacan is born in Paris, April 13, to a family of solid Catholic tradition. He is educated at the Collège Stanislas, a Jesuit school. He has a sister, Magdeleine-Marie and a younger brother Marc-Marie, who later becomes a Benedictine at the abbey of Hautecombe. His brother’s name appears before those of his parents in his thesis dedication....

Transference in Freud and Lacan

What is “transference”? “Transference” is a psychoanalytic term that refers to something that is very common in daily life: People displace unresolved conflicts, dependencies, and aggressions onto others (e.g. substituting a lover, spouse, etc. for one’s parent) for reasons that are not easily understandable. This operation occurs commonly in psychotherapy when a client transfers feelings that were previously directed to someone else to the therapist. The client sees in her therapist the return of some important figure from her childhood or past and consequently transfers on to him feelings and reactions from the past. Early childhood relationships, memories, and emotions,...

Press Conference by Jacques Lacan in Rome, 29 October 1974.

Press Conference by Doctor Jacques Lacan at the French Cultural Center, Rome, 29 October 1974.Published in the Lettres de l’École freudienne, 1975, n° 16, pp. 6-26.  during which I have taught in a way that has carved out, it might be said, my positions. I [1] J. Lacan – I already took up my positions in psychoanalysis, in 1953 more precisely. There was a first Congress in October, in Rome. I think, (I didn’t ask), I imagine a sort of anniversary party was being planned for me: it’s quite a long time 21 years; the 21 years had already started...

Theology in Freud and Lacan

 A Short Summary of the Arguments. In the struggle to find what sustains the psychological reality of religious belief as well as its deep rootedness, psychoanalysis loses its initial hostility against the phenomenon. Religion becomes a fascinating field to study from the psychoanalytic point of view. The development of the psychoanalytic interpretation of religion from Freud to Lacan shows how psychoanalytic theory itself was transformed through this task. Analysis of the religious phenomenon leads to the core of Lacanian theory, which is the constitutive function of the signifier in relation to the subject. Freud’s psychoanalytic study of Moses and Monotheism is the...

Lacanian Graph of Desire

Lacan developed his graph of desire in four stages – you find them below. The graphs and the theory behind it can be found in the 1960 essay “The Subversion of the Subject and the Dialectic of Desire in the Freudian Unconscious.” In: Jacques Lacan, Ecrits, trans. Bruce Fink (New York: W.W.Norton &Company, 2006), p. 435.

Thinking and Being: Lacan versus Parmenides

When Lacan describes his epistemology, he occasionally alludes to Parmenides, whose philosophy marks the beginning of the reflection on being in Western thinking. ’There’s no such thing as a metalanguage.’ When I say that, it apparently means — no language of being. But is there being? As I pointed out last time, what I say is what there isn’t. Being is, as they say, and nonbeing is not. There is or there isn’t. Being is merely pre­sumed in certain words — “individual,” for instance, and “substance.” In my view, it is but a fact of what is said (un fait de dit). The word “subject” that...

Subject, Ego, Person

This short essay, written in August and September 2001, could also be entitled “The Religious Roots of  Our Concept of the Person.” I argue that: we need to make a distinction between “something” and “someone;” this was done in the past through a religious definition of the origin of the human being; it has been secularized into the concept of the person, The term expresses the internal relationship of “having a nature.” Therefore we are not just “something”, we are “someone,” and as such not entirely subjected to nature. Since the distinction itself is not natural, it works only if...

Jacques Lacan Quotes

Lacan (1901-1981) was a French psychoanalyst and psychiatrist. He made major contributions to psychoanalysis and philosophy, and has been called “the most controversial psycho-analyst since Freud”. He gave yearly seminars in Paris, from 1953 to 1981. He had a strong influence on France’s intellectuals in the 60s, 70s, and 80s, and he is sometimes grouped into the field of post-structural thinkers. His work was interdisciplinary; he tried to reconcile psychoanalysis with sciences like linguistics,  topology, and philosophy. Throughout his life, he remained loyal to Freud. At the end of his life, he said in a seminar: “It is up to you to be Lacanians if you wish. I am a Freudian.” (All quotes...

Lacan’s Baltimore Lecture 1966

Of Structure as an Inmixing of an Otherness Prerequisite to Any Subject Whatever (Lacan Talk at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, 1966) Somebody spent some time this afternoon trying to convince me that it would surely not be a pleasure for an English-speaking audience to listen to my bad accent and that for me to speak in English would constitute a risk for what one might call the transmission of my message. Truly, for me it is a great case of conscience, because to do otherwise would be absolutely contrary to my own concept of the message: of the message as...

Interview with Jacques Lacan

Interview with Jacques Lacan, 1957 Published in L’Express in May 1957. Interviewer: A psychoanalyst is very intimidating. One has the feeling that he could manipulate you as he wishes, that he knows more than you about the motives of your actions. Dr. Lacan: Don’t exaggerate. Do you think that this effect is exclusive to the psycho-analyst? An economist, for many, is as mysterious as an analyst. In our time, it is the expert who intimidates. With psychology, even when seen as a science, everyone thought they had the insider’s track. Now, with psychoanalysis, we have the feeling of having lost...