Tagged: Max Weber

Politics as a Vocation

By Max Weber, 1918. THIS lecture, which I give at your request, will necessarily disappoint you in a number of ways. You will naturally expect me to take a position on actual problems of the day. But that will be the case only in a purely formal way and toward the end, when I shall raise certain questions concerning the significance of political action in the whole way of life. In today’s lecture, all questions that refer to what policy and what content one should give one’s political activity must be eliminated. For such questions have nothing to do with...

Max Weber – Quotes

“There is no absolutely “objective” scientific analysis of culture… All knowledge of cultural reality… is always knowledge from particular points of view. … an “objective” analysis of cultural events, which proceeds according to the thesis that the ideal of science is the reduction of empirical reality to “laws,” is meaningless… [because]… the knowledge of social laws is not knowledge of social reality but is rather one of the various aids used by our minds for attaining this end.” —Max Weber, “Objectivity” in Social Science, 1897. We know of no scientifically ascertainable ideals. To be sure, that makes our efforts more...

Max Weber: Science as Vocation

 This is a lecture Weber gave in 1918 in Munich: You wish me to speak about ‘Science as a Vocation.’ Now, we political economists have a pedantic custom, which I should like to follow, of always beginning with the external conditions. In this case, we begin with the question: What are the conditions of science as a vocation in the material sense of the term? Today this question means, practically and essentially: What are the prospects of a graduate student who is resolved to dedicate himself professionally to science in university life? In order to understand the peculiarity of German...

Max Weber

Max Weber lived from 1864 – 1920. He is one of the architects of modern social science, and he deeply influenced sociology and social theory. His approach is interpretative; he is not just focused on the collection of empirical data. He is famous for his book “The Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Capitalism,” 1934. Max Weber was born in Erfurt, Germany, the eldest of seven children of Max Weber and his wife Helene. He was, along with Karl Marx, Vilfredo Pareto and Emile Durkheim, one of the founders of modern sociology. Whereas Pareto and Durkheim, following Comte, worked in...