Tagged: Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde: De Profundis. 1897

“De Profundis” is a letter written by Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) in 1897, during his two-year imprisonment for the crime of “gross indecency with other men.” He had been in an intimate relationship with a young aristocratic man, whose father decided to accuse  Oscar Wilde of sodomy. Wilde lost the ensuing lawsuit for libel and was subsequently arrested and tried for indecent sexual acts, based on testimony from several young male prostitutes. Here are some excerpts from the text:  . . . Suffering is one very long moment.  We cannot divide it by seasons.  We can only record its moods, and...

Oscar Wilde: The Soul of Man under Socialism.

“The Soul of Man under Socialism” is an essay by Oscar Wilde, written in 1891. He argues for a libertarian socialist worldview, and a critique of charity. He wrote this article after he converted to anarchist philosophy, and following his reading of the works of Peter Kropotkin. In this essay, Wilde argues that, under capitalism, “the majority of people spoil their lives by an unhealthy and exaggerated altruism—are forced, indeed, so to spoil them“: instead of realising their true talents, they waste their time solving the social problems caused by capitalism. Thus, caring people “seriously and very sentimentally set themselves to the task of remedying the evils that they...